Sunday, February 18, 2018

#BlackHistoryToonz Day 18: The Black Panthers

#BlackHistoryToonz Day 18: The Black Panthers


The Black Panther Party or the BPP (originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was a revolutionary socialist organization founded by Bobby Seale and Huey Newton in October 1966.

Huey P. Newton:

Huey P. Newton was an African-American
activist best known for founding the militant Black Panther Party with Bobby Seale in 1966.

Synopsis

Huey P. Newton was born in Monroe, Louisiana, on February 17, 1942, and named after former governor Huey P. Long. In 1966, Newton and Bobby Seale founded the left-wing Black Panther Party for Self Defense in Oakland, California. The organization was central to the Black Power movement, making headlines with its controversial rhetoric and militaristic style. Newton faced a number of criminal charges over the years and at one point fled to Cuba before returning to the U.S. and earning his doctorate. Struggling with drug and alcohol addiction in his later years, he was killed in 1989 in Oakland

Bobby Seale:
Bobby Seale is an African-American political activist and co-founder and national chairman of the Black Panther Party.

Synopsis

Born in Texas in 1936, Bobby Seale is one of a generation of young African-American radicals who broke away from the usually nonviolent Civil Rights Movement to preach a doctrine of militant black empowerment, helping found the Black Panthers (later renamed the Black Panther Party) in 1966. In the 1970s, as the Black Panthers faded from public view, Seale took on a quieter role, working toward improving social services in black neighborhoods and other causes.

Fred Hampton:

Fred Hampton (August 30, 1948 – December 4, 1969) was an African-American activist and revolutionary, chairman of the Illinoischapter of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and deputy chairman of the national BPP. Hampton and fellow Black Panther Mark Clarkwere killed during a raid by a tactical unit of the Cook County, Illinois State's Attorney's Office, in conjunction with the Chicago Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation in December 1969. In January
1970, a coroner's jury held an inquest and ruled the deaths of Hampton and Clark to be justifiable homicide. However, a civil lawsuit was later filed on behalf of the survivors and the relatives of Hampton and Clark. It was eventually resolved in 1982 for a settlement of $1.85 million with the City of ChicagoCook County, and the federal government each paying a third to a group of nine plaintiffs.






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